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Adelaide Convention Centre’s new East Building is open for business

The Adelaide Convention Centre redevelopment is officially complete, paving the way for thousands of conventions and events, expected to generate almost $2 billion dollars in economic activity and support 1,200 ongoing jobs.

The Stage Two East Building – the final element of the $397 million redevelopment – opened almost 30 years to the day that the original convention centre opened.

“Since opening in 1987, the Convention Centre has been a great South Australian success story,” comments Alec Gilbert, Chief Executive, Adelaide Convention Centre.

“Over the past 30 years, the Centre has played host to 1,800 major conferences, welcomed more than six million delegates and visitors, and generated $1.4 million in economic benefit for the state of South Australia. The future looks even brighter, with the expanded venue forecast to inject an additional $1.92 billion into the state’s economy over the next 25 years.”

The East Building replaces the Original Plenary Building, the first convention centre in Australia, and follows the completion of the West Building in July 2015.

Together, the East, Central and West Buildings deliver 20,000sqm of multi-purpose event space, offering sweeping views of the Riverbank precinct.

The centrepiece of the East Building’s innovation and flexibility is its new state-of-the-art Plenary Hall, which has tiered seating for 3,500 or offers 3,000sqm of flat floor space for exhibitions or banquets.

TTF Chief Executive, Margy Osmond, said the nine-year, $397 million East Building redevelopment will pave the way for Adelaide to take full advantage of Australia’s lucrative business and major events markets.

“The wait has well and truly been worth it,” Ms Osmond said. “The inspired design of the building will make it an instant icon of the city and put it on par with convention facilities anywhere in the world.

“Conferences and business events are an important driver of Adelaide’s visitor economy and investing in the facilities that encourage growth of these markets supports jobs, encourages visitation and contributes significantly to local economies.

“Business events are a particularly lucrative market with visitors often spending up to four times more than regular tourists on accommodation, restaurants, entertainment, shopping and transport.

“The South Australian Government estimates the project will inject an additional $1.9 billion into the state’s economy over the next 25 years, and it is already paying dividends with large-scale events such the World Indigenous Peoples Conference on Education lining up to use the facility.

“However, the net worth of business and conference events far exceeds their hard dollar value – they promote and showcase local innovation to the world, attract investment and bring national and international leaders into cities they would otherwise not have visited.”

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